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A Retrospective Study  of the Rate of Complications in Infra-inguinal  Angioplasties: SFA vs CFA Percutaneous Approach �
EP30694
Poster Title: A Retrospective Study of the Rate of Complications in Infra-inguinal Angioplasties: SFA vs CFA Percutaneous Approach �
Submitted on 27 Sep 2019
Author(s): N Mupambo, A Butt, G Centini
Affiliations:
This poster was presented at BIR Annual Congress 2019
Poster Views: 129
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Poster Information
Abstract: Introduction:

Peripheral vascular disease is a common condition, which decreases patients’ quality of life, and potentially leads to loss of limb or life. Angioplasty is the intervention of choice in many patients, as they commonly have co-morbidities, which make prolonged bypass procedures undesirable1. Access during angioplasties is most commonly gained through puncture of the ipsilateral CFA or SFA. Traditionally, SFA puncture has been associated with increased risk of complications, however newer studies have begun to disprove this2. We aim to determine whether there is a difference in the rate of complications at our small, rural center.


Methods:

We retrospectively analyzed data from patients who had antegrade infra-inguinal angioplasties between 05/01/16 and 21/12/16.


Results:

173 patients underwent an infra-inguinal angioplasty. Of these, 17 (9.82%) were excluded; due to having a retrograde procedure. 124 (79%) had a CFA puncture, compared to 32 (21%) who had an SFA puncture. There was a higher incidence of failed attempt and haematoma/ fluid collection in the SFA compared to the CFA group; 9.4% vs 7.3% and 3.1% vs 1.6% respectively. SFA puncture had a lower risk of bleeding (0%) than CFA puncture (2.4%.) There was no case of pseudoaneurysm formation in either group


Conclusions:

The differences in development of minor complications were minute, although the sample size was too small for any meaningful statistical analyses. The use of SFA puncture is a safe alternative to CFA puncture. Interventionist may need to consider lowering their threshold for planned SFA puncture in selected patients.

Summary: The differences in development of minor complications were minute, although the sample size was too small for any meaningful statistical analyses. The use of SFA puncture is a safe alternative to CFA puncture. Interventionist may need to consider lowering their threshold for planned SFA puncture in selected patients.

References: Rooke, TW, ACCF/AHA focused update of the guideline for the management of patients with peripheral artery disease (updating the 2005 guideline, J Vasc Surg, 2011, 54(5):e32–e58

Konstantinos K, Standards of practice for superficial femoral and popliteal artery angioplasty and stenting, Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol, 2014, 37:592- 603

Marcus A.J, Access to the superficial femoral artery in the presence of a “hostile groin”: A prospective study, Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol, 2007, 30: 251-354

Kim D, Role of superficial femoral artery puncture in the development of pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula complicating percutaneous transfemoral cardiac cathetarisation, Cathe Cardiovasc Diagn, 1992, 25: 91-97

Kweon, M, Antegrade superficial femoral artery vs common femoral artery punctures for infrainguinal occlusive disease, J Vasc and Interven Radiol, 2012, 23: 1160-1164
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