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Advanced HRMS techniques for the screening of organic micropollutants in white tailed sea eagles through wide scope target and suspect methodologies
EP38418
Poster Title: Advanced HRMS techniques for the screening of organic micropollutants in white tailed sea eagles through wide scope target and suspect methodologies
Submitted on 08 Mar 2022
Author(s): Georgios Gkotsis 1 Alexander Badry 2 Gabriele Treu 3 Maria Christina Nika 1 Nikiforos Alygizakis 1 Oliver Krone 2 Carsten Baessmann 4 Artem Filipenko 5 Nikolaos S Thomaidis 1
Affiliations: 1 National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece 2 Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Department of Wildlife Diseases, Berlin, Germany 3 Umweltbundesamt, Department Chemicals, Dessau Rosslau Germany 4 Bruker Daltonics GmbH Co KG, Bremen, Germany 5 Bruker Daltonics Billerica, MA
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Abstract: The increasing use of chemicals has shown to result in environmental emissions and wildlife exposures. Thus, the investigation of the distribution of organic micropollutants in top predators is important not only for understanding exposures within food webs, but also for improving risk management in order to contribute to species conservation. White tailed sea eagles are a powerful sentinel species for environmental studies, due to their high position in food webs, their relatively long lifespan as well as their residency throughout the year, which allows for the spatiotemporal integration of pollutants signals. In this context, 30 liver samples of recently deceased eagles from Northern Germany, were analyzed following state of the art HRMS methodologiesSummary: White tailed sea eagles are a powerful sentinel species for environmental studies, due to their high position in food webs, their relatively long lifespan as well as their residency throughout the year, which allows for the spatiotemporal integration of pollutants signals.Report abuse »
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