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Antibodies-for-Alzheimers-Disease-crenezumab
EP32924
Poster Title: Antibodies-for-Alzheimers-Disease-crenezumab
Submitted on 21 Aug 2020
Author(s): Creative Biolabs
Affiliations:
This poster was presented at https://www.creativebiolabs.net/
Poster Views: 69
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Poster Information
Abstract: Today around 47 million people survive with dementia, globally. This number is
projected to increase to more than 131 million by 2050. About 2.1 million
Alzheimer's patients having the age of 85 years or older were reported in the year
2017. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common multifactorial
diseases, including a range of abnormal cellular/molecular processes occurring
in different regions of the brain. This disease is considered to be a major
contributor to dementia in elderly people. The pathophysiology involves
the accumulation of extracellular plaques containing the β-amyloid protein which
is generated by the breakdown of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the
brain. Another mechanism involves the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary
tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. The AD can be classified into two
types, familial AD (FAD) and sporadic AD (SAD) based on heritability apart from
this the early-onset AD (EOAD) and late-onset AD (LOAD) forms are based on
the age of onset. Some proteins, such as APOE, APP, BACE (b-amyloid cleaving
enzyme), secretases, PS1/2 and tau proteins are reported in AD brain and have
been correlated with disease. It is still unclear whether this disease comprises
genetic or environmental factors or both. https://www.creativebiolabs.net/symbolsearch_APP.htm
Summary: Today around 47 million people survive with dementia, globally. This number is
projected to increase to more than 131 million by 2050. About 2.1 million
Alzheimer's patients having age of 85 years or older were reported in year
2017.
References: https://www.creativebiolabs.net/resource/pdf/com/brochure/Antibodies-for-Alzheimers-Disease.pdfReport abuse »
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