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ASSESSMENT OF A MICROPATTERNED HEPATOCYTE CO-CULTURE SYSTEM TO DETECT COMPOUNDS THAT CAUSE DRUG INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN HUMANS
EP22559
Poster Title: ASSESSMENT OF A MICROPATTERNED HEPATOCYTE CO-CULTURE SYSTEM TO DETECT COMPOUNDS THAT CAUSE DRUG INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN HUMANS
Submitted on 12 Dec 2014
Author(s): Salman Khetani, Chitra Kanchagar, Stacy Krzyzewski, Michael D. Aleo and Yvonne Will
Affiliations: Pfizer, Hepregen
This poster was presented at 2012 SOT
Poster Views: 1,691
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Poster Information
Abstract: In vitro approaches which reliably predict in vivo human drug metabolite profiles are highly desired as a means to streamline drug development timelines and substantially reduce development costs. Major metabolites of many compounds can be predicted using traditional in vitro systems such as liver microsomes. The rates of success, however, are typically in the range of 50%. Thus, there is considerable room for improving in vitro systems for predicting human metabolite profiles. This case study demonstrates the increased success of Hepregen’s HepatoPac™ system in identifying primary and secondary circulating and excretory metabolites when compared to liver microsomes, S-9 fractions and primary human hepatocyte suspensions for a series of 27 compounds with known in vivo human metabolite profiles.Summary: This case study demonstrates the increased success of Hepregen’s novel micro-patterned co-culture system in identifying primary and secondary circulating and excretory metabolites when compared to liver microsomes, S-9 fractions and primary human hepatocyte suspensions for a series of 27 compounds with known in vivo human metabolite profiles.References: 1. Xu, J.J. et al. Cellular imaging predictions of clinical drug-induced liver injury. Toxicol Sci. 105(1), 97-105 (2008).
2. Khetani, S.R. & Bhatia, S.N. Microscale culture of human liver cells for drug development. Nat Biotechnol, 26(1), 120-
126 (2007).
3. Hewitt et al. Review (Current understanding of….)
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