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Automated Genomic DNA QC Ensures High Quality Data from Downstream Workflows
EP20525
Poster Title: Automated Genomic DNA QC Ensures High Quality Data from Downstream Workflows
Submitted on 18 Dec 2013
Author(s): Arunkumar Padmanaban, Ruediger Salowsky, Delphine Rabiller and Donna McDade Walker
Affiliations: Agilent Technologies
Poster Views: 3,968
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Poster Information
Abstract: The success of several genomics study depends primarily on the quality of starting material, which in most cases is the genomic DNA. The quality and quantity of the extracted genomic DNA affects the downstream applications like microarray studies, library constructions and gene expression studies. Since, these are expensive and time consuming applications the QC of the genomic DNA has become a mandatory at several stages of the experiment. The integrity of genomic DNA was traditionally studied using Agarose gel, which is more manual, cumbersome and involves exposure to hazardous chemicals like ethidium bromide.Summary: The success of several genomics study depends primarily on the quality of starting material, which in most cases is the genomic DNA. The quality and quantity of the extracted genomic DNA affects the downstream applications like microarray studies, library constructions and gene expression studies.References: Report abuse »
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