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Characterization of Food Products by GCxGC-TOFMS and GC-High Resolution TOFMS: A Food "omics" Approach
EP22995
Poster Title: Characterization of Food Products by GCxGC-TOFMS and GC-High Resolution TOFMS: A Food "omics" Approach
Submitted on 14 May 2015
Author(s): Elizabeth M. Humston-Fulmer, Jeff Patrick, Joe Binkley, and David Alonso
Affiliations: LECO Corporation
This poster was presented at ASMS 2014
Poster Views: 2,963
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Poster Information
Abstract: Gas chromatography (GC) paired with mass spectrometry (MS) is an effective tool for characterizing and distinguishing food products. Individual analytes can be isolated from complex food matrices with GC and identified with MS. This type of information provides food “omics” insight at various stages throughout production, including differentiation of raw materials, process changes, and finished products. As sample complexity increases, additional resolution can be gained with mathematical deconvolution of TOFMS data, two-dimensional GC (GC×GC), and/or with high-resolution MS (HR-TOFMS) to help isolate even more individual analytes. These analytical tools allowed for comparing food products by their chromatographic fingerprints, characterizing samples with the identification of individual analyte differences, and differentiating samples with PCA. These capabilities have implications in quality control, process optimization, and detection of food fraud, among others.Summary: This poster has demonstrated the broad applicability of GC and TOFMS in the food and beverage industry with highlighted examples from edible oils, hops, and beer. HS-SPME was used to pre-concentrate and collect volatile and semi-volatile analytes from each sample for analysis by LECO’s Pegasus 4D, HT, and/or HRT. This type of information provides food “omics” insight at various stages throughout production, including differentiation of raw materials, process changes, and finished products. Report abuse »
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