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Clinical and Scientific Evidence for the Safety and Efficacy of XanMax® Lutein/Zeaxanthin
EP32604
Poster Title: Clinical and Scientific Evidence for the Safety and Efficacy of XanMax® Lutein/Zeaxanthin
Submitted on 21 May 2020
Author(s): Priya, M.K., Lelah, M.
Affiliations: Katra (Phytochem) India, Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore, India and NutriScience Innovations LLC, Trumbull CT, USA
This poster was presented at TBD
Poster Views: 532
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Poster Information
Abstract: We review the direct evidence for the safety and efficacy of XanMax® 2002 free lutein/zeaxanthin. Animal studies demonstrated that XanMax® 2002 lutein/zeaxanthin was well absorbed into the blood and with increased macular deposits of lutein and zeaxanthin, and increased antioxidant potential. In a human study, these increases in macular levels of lutein and zeaxanthin were demonstrated to improve macular pigment optical density (MPOD) by 40%. The three studies, when integrated together, demonstrate that supplementing the diet with XanMax® 2002 can be measured by absorption into the blood, deposition in the macular, and improvements in MPOD. No abnormalities or adverse events were reported. We conclude that supplementation with XanMax® 2002 lutein/zeaxanthin is a safe and effective means to increase macular pigmentation, therefore demonstrating benefits for healthy aging and improved eye health.
Summary: We review the direct evidence for the safety and efficacy of XanMax® 2002 free lutein/zeaxanthin.We conclude that supplementation with XanMax® 2002 lutein/zeaxanthin is a safe and effective means to increase macular pigmentation, therefore demonstrating benefits for healthy aging and improved eye health.References: 1. Gao, Shashaet al. “Lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation reduces H2O2-induced oxidative damage in human lens epithelial cells.” Molecular Visionvol. 17 (2011): 3180-90
2. WidomskaJ, ZarebaM, SubczynskiWK. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain? Foods 2016;5(1)
3. https://www.nature.com/articles/eye201398
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7933422
5. Age Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) Research Group (2014). JAMA Ophthalmol . 132: 142 149
6. Pharmacognosy Magazine, Volume 14, Issue 54, April-June 2018, pp. 268-274
7. Study Protocol CTRI2016/10/007413 http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php
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