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Cycling of organic matter through the pelagic food web under warmer acidified ocean conditions
EP21391
Poster Title: Cycling of organic matter through the pelagic food web under warmer acidified ocean conditions
Submitted on 24 Feb 2014
Author(s): Monika Winder, J. Rafael Bermúdez, Thomas Hansen, Jay Brandes, Eric Thompson
Affiliations: Stockholm University
Poster Views: 989
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Poster Information
Abstract: Our present understanding of climate change on marine organisms is often restricted to individual species and single stressors, while consequences for carbon cycling under simultaneous impacts of multiple drivers are uncertain. Here we investigate effects of increasing temperature and ocean acidification on cycling of organic matter from primary producers to terminal zooplankton consumers (copepods and appendicularians) of a natural and manipulated coastal plankton community using 13C labeled bicarbonate. Enrichment with 13C indicated both exchange and drawdown over time, which was strongest at increased temperature. Combined fatty acid-specific 13C isotope analysis indicates differential responses of phytoplankton taxa and increased growth of diatoms under climate change. While warming in combination with acidification has weak net effects on phytoplankton standing stock, turnover rates increased at higher temperature, suggesting that climate warming largely affects carbon transfer rates. However, the effects were strongly dependent on plankton species composition, suggesting that consumer composition is crucial in mediating climate effects. This study highlights that climate warming alters carbon flow through the planktonic food web, which will have significant effects on trophic transfer, particle sedimentation and nutrient cycling.Summary: This study highlights that climate warming alters carbon flow through the planktonic food web, which will have significant effects on trophic transfer, particle sedimentation and nutrient cycling.References: Report abuse »
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