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DETERMINATION OF ESSENTIAL AND HEAVY METALS IN KENYAN HONEY BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION AND EMMISSION SPECTROSCOPY
EP22861
Poster Title: DETERMINATION OF ESSENTIAL AND HEAVY METALS IN KENYAN HONEY BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION AND EMMISSION SPECTROSCOPY
Submitted on 30 Mar 2015
Author(s): A. Mbiri, A. Onditi, N. Oyaro
Affiliations: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
This poster was presented at Pittcon
Poster Views: 2,463
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Poster Information
Abstract: Due to the nutritive and medicinal value of honey for both man and animals, qualitative and quantitative analyses of the minerals is of great importance. Heavy metals and high concentration of essential metals can be toxic to both man and animals. Rapid increase in industrialization in Kenya has led to environmental pollution, hence increase of these metals in honey. In this study, honey samples collected from different parts of Kenya, namely, Laikipia, Baringo, Naiorobi, Ngong, Mbeere, Embu, Kitui, Kibwezi and Lamu were analyzed to determine the levels of selected heavy metals (Pb, Cd,Zn, Cu, As) and essential metals (K, Na, ca, Mg, Fe). The samples were analyzed using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and flame atomic emission spectroscopy (FAES). Hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) was used to determine arsenic. Results obtained from this study showed that K, Na, Ca and Mg mean values ranged from 781.52±0.09 to 172.83±0.02 ppm, 269.1 to 98.04±0.03 ppm, 70.17±3.9 ppm to 19.33±4.07 ppm and 41.88±0.92 to 12.64±0.43 ppm respectively. Most of the samples had high level of Zn with mean value of 0.19±0.06 ppm followed by Pb with mean value of 0.16±0.10 ppm, then Cu with mean value of 0.02±0.01 ppm followed by Cd with mean value of 0.02±0.01 ppm and finally As with mean value of 0.01±0.01 ppm. The concentration of Pb in most samples was found to be above the World Health Organization (WHO) and Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) limits of 0.1 ppm in food products.
Keywords: Honey, heavy metals, essential metals, atomic spectroscopy.
Summary: Generally, honey samples recorded very low concentrations of As compared to the other heavy metals determined in this study. The highest concentration of As was recorded in honey sample from Nairobi with a value of 0.03±0.01 ppm. All the values recorded were within the KEBS permitted value of 0.5 ppm in food according to Kenya Bureaue of Standards, 1996.References: 1. Coldex Almentarius Commission (1983/84). Proposed Codex Standard for Honey (Rome: FAO/WHO) CX/PFV 84/13
2. Hase S. (1973). Changes in Quality of Honey Caused by Heating and Storage, pp 248-256.
3. Watton M. (1976, 1978). Effect of accelerated storage conditions on the chemical composition and properties of Australlian honeys, pp 23-28, 167-172.
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