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Effects of Increased Fructose Consumption and Inadequate Copper Intake on the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): A Feces, Plasma and Liver Metabolomics Study
EP24258
Poster Title: Effects of Increased Fructose Consumption and Inadequate Copper Intake on the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): A Feces, Plasma and Liver Metabolomics Study
Submitted on 21 Jul 2016
Author(s): David E. Alonso, Biyun Shi, Ming Song, Xinmin Yin, Xiaoli Wei, Michelle Page, Joe Binkley, Craig McClain, and Xiang Zhang
Affiliations: LECO Corporation, University of Louisville
This poster was presented at Metabolomics
Poster Views: 1,579
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Poster Information
Abstract: Inflammation, oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity are key clinical riskf actors for the progression of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Interactions between diet, liver, and immune system play an important role in this disease. Increased fructose consumption and inadequate copper intake are two critical factors that may contribute to metabolic syndrome and lead to the development of diseases such as NAFLD. For example, increased consumption of high fructose corn syrup has been associated with liver fibrosis severity in subjects with NAFLD.
Metabolomics is a viable method for identifying compounds associated with NAFLD. In this investigation, high quality data facilitate the identification of key metabolites differentiating normal versus diseased species.
Objectives
• To further investigate the relationship between copper deficiency and fructose-induced fatty liver disease.
• Implement the use of enhanced, comprehensive chromatography and high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry for separation and confident identification of metabolites in samples
Summary: 38 metabolites detected with significant abundance alteration between the study groups were easily and automatically identified using high quality data and superior processing tools

Enhanced two-dimensional chromatographic resolution, spectral similarity searches of large, well-established databases, and formula determinations using high resolution accurate mass ions increased confidence in metabolite characterization.
References: Y-S. Lai, W-C Chen, T-C Kuo, C-T. ho, C-H. Kuo, F.J. Tseng, K-H. Lu, S-H. Lin, S. Panyodand L-Y Sheen, J. Agric. Food Chem., 2015, 63, 7873-7884.

X. Shi, X. Wei, X. Yin, Y. Wang, M. Zhang, C. zhao, H. Zhao, C.J. McClain, W. Feng and X. Zhang, J. Proteome Res., 2015, 14(2), 1174-1182.

X. Wei, M. Song, X. Yin, D.A. Schuschke, I. Koo, C.J. McClain and X. Zhang, J. Proteome Res., 2015, 14(9),4050-405.

M.F. Abdelmalek, A. Suzuk, C. Guy, A. Unalp-Arida, R. Colvin, R.J. Johnson and A.M. Diehl, Hepatology, 2010, 51(6), 1961-1971.
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