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Identification of Proteins that Enhance Frost Tolerance Utilizing a 2D-DIGE Approach
EP20196
Poster Title: Identification of Proteins that Enhance Frost Tolerance Utilizing a 2D-DIGE Approach
Submitted on 19 Dec 2013
Author(s): Russell G. Trischuk, Jay Lorch, G. Reid Asbury, Viola C. Ruddat and Lawrence V. Gusta
Affiliations: GE Healthcare, Amersham Biosciences Corp.,University of Saskatchewan, Canada
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Poster Information
Abstract: Un-seasonal frosts are a major restraint to crop production in Canada. Crops such as canola, are very frost sensitive. However, when exposed to low temperature (LT), they can increase their frost tolerance. During exposure to low non-freezing temperatures, genes are up-regulated or down-regulated to allow for changes in cell structure, cytoplasm and metabolite composition and hormone balance. The role of cold-induced proteins is to protect the cells from freezing-induced desiccation due to the formation of ice within their tissues.

These proteins fall into three major classes: transcription factors, cryoprotective proteins and cell detoxifiers Transcription factors induce and regulate downstream low temperature associated genes and gene families. For example, a Crepeat Binding Factor (CBF), binds to a C-repeat region present in the promoter of COld Responsive (COR) genes. Dehydrins, a family of cryoprotective proteins (LEA D11 proteins) form complexes with proteins or cellular structures to prevent denaturation during freezing. Metabolism under low temperatures results in a drastic increase in free radical molecules causing nucleic acid, protein and membrane disruption. SuperOxide Dismutase (SOD) metabolizes superoxide into hydrogen peroxide, a less toxic molecule which the cell can deal with.

The proteome of the plant differs based on the type of LT exposure as well as its frost tolerance. We compared the proteomes of freezing-sensitive (no LT exposure), freezing-tolerant (23days at below 100C, non-natural cold-shocked (24h at 20C; directly transferred) and near-natural cold-stressed (24h at 2 0C; gradually cooled) canola.

Using the EttanTM DIGE and the Ettan MDLC systems, we have been able to quantify changes in protein expression specific to each type of LT exposure, as well as those common to all, which have a high probability of being frost-associated proteins.
Summary: Un-seasonal frosts are a major restraint to crop production in Canada. Crops such as canola, are very frost sensitive. However, when exposed to low temperature (LT), they can increase their frost tolerance.Report abuse »
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