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MolluSCAN eye, an autonomous unmanned system for long term recordings of bivalve behavior from the Pole to the Equator
EP20794
Poster Title: MolluSCAN eye, an autonomous unmanned system for long term recordings of bivalve behavior from the Pole to the Equator
Submitted on 08 Feb 2014
Author(s): Jean-Charles Massabuau, Pierre Ciret, Gilles Durrieu, Mohamedou Sow, Damien Tran
Affiliations: CNRS and Université de Bordeaux
Poster Views: 2,517
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Poster Information
Abstract: MOLLUSCAN EYE, AN AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED SYSTEM FOR LONG TERM RECORDINGS OF BIVALVE BEHAVIOR FROM THE POLE TO THE EQUATOR.
The MolluSCAN Eye project makes use of the bivalve shell movements and the m2m world to monitor in near real-time water quality changes anywhere there is a cellular network or Ethernet socket. The project began in 2006 in France and we have now experience in Spain, Norway, Svalbard, Scotland and Russia. It is based on the activity of a multidisciplinary group of biologists, electronics specialist and mathematicians. We get informations from a group of 16 animals left alone for at least one year, set up such that they don’t know that we’re recording them at 10 Hz, 24/7. Then we rebuild their biological rhythms, growth rate and spawning activity before daily update on a public or professional website (google: molluscan eye). To do this, we glue <1 g electromagnets to each of their valves. In the field we have a slave unit composed of a waterproof case next to the clams and a card out of water (the whole thing is a low power,1W, fully-rugged Linux-running microcomputer). The master unit where data are automatically handled is in our lab. Our goal is to help document the world’s Ocean changes, to be a witness, and if possible to have a positive impact by allowing sharing and exchange of information among the most people possible.
Summary: The MolluSCAN Eye project makes use of the bivalve shell movements and the m2m world to monitor in various seas, and in near real-time, life history traits in groups of “abandoned” bivalves. It gives by extension, informations on water quality changes anywhere there is a cellular network or internet. References: (1) Schwartzmann C, G Durrieu, M Sow, P Ciret, CE. Lazareth and J-C Massabuau. (2011) In situ giant clam growth rate behavior in relation to temperature: a one year coupled study of high-frequency non-invasive valvometry and sclerochronology. Limnol. Oceanogr. 56(5): 1940-1951.
(2) Tran D, Nadau A, Durrieu G, Ciret P, Parisot JP, Massabuau JC (2011) Field chronobiology in a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms. Chronobiol. Int. 28: 307-317;
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