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Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Methods via DNA Nanotechnology
EP31558
Poster Title: Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Methods via DNA Nanotechnology
Submitted on 03 May 2020
Author(s): Katie Lamar, Autumn Awbrey,Kobe Hassenzahl, Dina Ibrahimzade, Matthew Laurence, Aakash Ramachandran, Massimiliano de Sa, Maureen Muñoz, Thalia Georgiou
Affiliations: University of California Berkeley, Undergraduate Lab at Berkeley
This poster was presented at ULAB Presentation
Poster Views: 594
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Poster Information
Abstract: The use of gold coated magnetic nanoparticles (gold coated MNPs) for targeted cancer treatment has shown to be promising, however, it poses one detrimental problem; nanoparticles can cause extensive damage to the human body as they become toxic when left inside for an extended period of time. In an effort to counteract this toxicity, we provide creative alternatives to ensure a less toxic route of clearance. Our team aims to make the use of gold nanoparticles for drug delivery a safe reality by designing a system that delivers the nanoparticles into the body and carries them out before they can cause trouble. Our proposal consists of three main mechanisms: release strand, magnetic field, and Callback BUS. The release strand is responsible for carrying the nanoparticles into the body, to their target location, and then releasing them to perform their intended task (the release of a drug). The magnetic field extracts the nanoparticles from their aggregation in the cell once treatment has been delivered. The BUS is a second DNA structure that will capture the particles and carry out a safe removal utilizing the body’s natural extraction processes. Our BUS structures utilize the concepts of DNA nanotechnology and DNA origami to form a safe and structurally sound vessel for nanoparticle transportation.Summary: Our team aims to make the use of gold nanoparticles for drug delivery a safe reality by designing a system that delivers the nanoparticles into the body and carries them out before they can cause trouble. We propose a method of delivering and calling back nanoparticles in order to reduce the harmful effects of toxicity on the body caused by the prolonged exposure to nanoparticles.References: References
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Kang, Huaizhi, et al. “Single-DNA Molecule Nanomotor Regulated by Photons.” Nano Letters, vol. 9, no. 7, 2009, pp. 2690–2696., doi:10.1021/nl9011694.

Kong, Fen-Ying, et al. “Unique Roles of Gold Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery, Targeting and Imaging Applications.” Molecules, vol. 22, no. 9, 2017, p. 1445., doi:10.3390/molecules22091445.

Lo, Pik Kwan, et al. “Loading and Selective Release of Cargo in DNA Nanotubes with Longitudinal Variation.” Nature News, Nature Publishing Group, 14 Mar. 2010, www.nature.com/articles/nchem.5
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