Posters
« Back
Prostate Cancer and Sarcoma: Challenges of Synchronous Malignancies
EP34312
Poster Title: Prostate Cancer and Sarcoma: Challenges of Synchronous Malignancies
Submitted on 29 Oct 2020
Author(s): Dr. Ali Shah, Dr. Luqman Wali, Dr. Fahd Husain, Dr. Sharmarke Ali
Affiliations: East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, Croydon Health Services NHS Trust
Poster Views: 44
View poster »


Poster Information
Abstract: Synchronous primary malignancies are a rare finding which can be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 57-year-old patient with a high prostate specific antigen who was found to have prostate cancer on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging. A skeletal metastasis was also identified at the time, though no osteoblastic activity or sclerosis was identified on skeletal scintigraphy or computed tomography respectively. The patient was started on hormonal therapy and follow-up imaging revealed the prostate cancer to have reduced in volume. Despite this, the skeletal metastasis appeared unchanged on magnetic resonance imaging and an F18-choline positron emission tomography study was negative. A computed tomography guided bone biopsy was organised and this demonstrated metastatic leiomyosarcoma. As a result, an F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study was performed to find the primary lesion which demonstrated a large malignant tumour within the calf. Subsequently, the patient was referred to a tertiary sarcoma unit. This case highlights the challenges involved in diagnosing and managing synchronous malignancies.Summary: Case report which highlights the challenges involved in diagnosing and managing synchronous malignancies.References: Vogt A, Schmid S, Heinimann K, Frick H, Herrmann C, Cerny T et al. Multiple primary tumours: challenges and approaches, a review. ESMO Open. 2017;2(2):e000172.

Chun-Sing W, Nan-Jie G, Yiu-Ching C. Prevalence of synchronous second primary malignancy: identification using whole body PET/CT imaging. Clinical Imaging. 2014;38(2):179-186.
Report abuse »
Creative Commons