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Radiographic Investigation of Suspected Mid-face Fractures – It Doesn’t Require Lateral Thinking.
EP33142
Poster Title: Radiographic Investigation of Suspected Mid-face Fractures – It Doesn’t Require Lateral Thinking.
Submitted on 21 Oct 2020
Author(s): Samuel Reeves, Adam Shathur
Affiliations: Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
This poster was presented at BIR Annual Conference 2020
Poster Views: 321
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Poster Information
Abstract: Background: Suspected zygomatic and maxillary fractures are common presentation to emergency departments and radiographs form an integral part of their diagnosis.
Aims: To assess current protocols for the radiographic investigation of suspected zygomatic and maxillary fractures that present to an emergency department.
Standards: 2 x Occipitomental views = 90% (Local OMFS Protocol)
Methodology: Retrospective audit over 3 months where all patients who had radiographs requested for suspected zygomatic and maxillary fractures were included.
Results: 86 patients identified. Only 1 met the standard, with the most common protocol being 2 x Occipitomental views and a lateral skull view. 9 fractures identified, none of which were evident on the lateral skull view alone.
Conclusion: Patients are routinely exposed to unnecessary radiation, as lateral skull views offer little when investigating suspected fractures of the maxilla and zygoma. There appears to be different protocols adopted by emergency and OMFS departments, necessitating a definitive trust-wide protocol.
Summary: Poster titled Radiographic Investigation of Suspected Mid-face Fractures – It Doesn’t Require Lateral Thinking" for BIR Annual Conference 2020References: 1. Patel S, Samways A, Hall D, Patel V, Khan H, Al-Saadi N et al. Patterns of Maxillofacial Trauma in a Major UK Trauma Centre – A 4 Year Retrospective Review. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 2016; 54(10).e151.
2. Raby N, Moore D. Radiography of facial trauma, the lateral view is not required. Clinical Radiology. 1998;53(3):218-220.
3. Mcglinchey I, Fleet M, Eatock F, Raby N. A comparison of two or three radiographic views in the diagnosis of skull fractures. Clinical Radiology. 1998;53(3):215-217.
4. Ceallaigh P, Ekanaykaee K, Beirne C, Patton D. Diagnosis and management of common maxillofacial injuries in the emergency department. Part 3: orbitozygomatic complex and zygomatic arch fractures. Emergency Medicine Journal. 2007;24(2):120-122.
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