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Structure, Transport, and Seasonality of the Atlantic Water Boundary Current North of Svalbard: Results From a Yearlong Mooring Array
EP30494
Poster Title: Structure, Transport, and Seasonality of the Atlantic Water Boundary Current North of Svalbard: Results From a Yearlong Mooring Array
Submitted on 21 Aug 2019
Author(s): M. Dolores Pérez‐Hernández1,2 , Robert S. Pickart1 , Daniel J. Torres1 , Frank Bahr1 , Arild Sundfjord3 , Randi Ingvaldsen4 , Angelika H. H. Renner4 , Agnieska Beszczynska‐Möller5 , Wilken‐Jon von Appen6 , and Vladimir Pavlov3
Affiliations: 1Department of Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA, 2Marine and Freshwater Research Institute, Reykjavik, Iceland, 3Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway, 4Institute of Marine Research, Tromsø, Norway, 5Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland, 6Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
This poster was presented at OceanObs'19
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Poster Information
Abstract: The characteristics and seasonality of the Svalbard branch of the Atlantic Water (AW) boundary current in the Eurasian Basin are investigated using data from a six‐mooring array deployed near 30°E between September 2012 and September 2013. The instrument coverage extended to 1,200‐m depth and approximately 50 km offshore of the shelf break, which laterally bracketed the flow. Averaged over the year, the transport of the current over this depth range was 3.96 ± 0.32 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3/s). The transport within the AW layer was 2.08 ± 0.24 Sv. The current was typically subsurface intensified, and its dominant variability was associated with pulsing rather than meandering. From late summer to early winter the AW was warmest and saltiest, and its eastward transport was strongest (2.44 ± 0.12 Sv), while from midspring to midsummer the AW was coldest and freshest and its transport was weakest (1.10 ± 0.06 Sv). Deep mixed layers developed through the winter, extending to 400‐ to 500‐m depth in early spring until the pack ice encroached the area from the north shutting off the air‐sea buoyancy forcing. This vertical mixing modified a significant portion of the AW layer, suggesting that, as the ice cover continues to decrease
in the southern Eurasian Basin, the AW will be more extensively transformed via local ventilation.
Summary: The Svalbard branch of the Atlantic Water (AW) flows eastward north of Svalbard carrying warm and salty waters along the slope of the western Eurasian Basin. Here we explore the characteristics and seasonality of the boundary current using data from a six‐mooring array deployed at 81.7°N, 30.6°E between September 2012 and September 2013. References: Pérez‐Hernández, M. D., Pickart, R. S., Torres, D. J., Bahr, F., Sundfjord, A., Ingvaldsen, R., et al. (2019). Structure, transport, and seasonality of the Atlantic Water boundary current north of Svalbard: Results from a yearlong mooring array. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 124, 1679– 1698Report abuse »
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