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Taylor Dispersion Analysis for the characterization of mixtures and quantification of protein aggregates
EP23558
Poster Title: Taylor Dispersion Analysis for the characterization of mixtures and quantification of protein aggregates
Submitted on 28 Oct 2015
Author(s): Seyi Latunde-Dada, Rachel Bott, Karl Hampton, Jenika Patel, Oksana I. Leszczyszyn
Affiliations: Malvern Instruments
This poster was presented at The Bioprocessing Summit, Boston, August 2015
Poster Views: 1,983
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Poster Information
Abstract: In this work, we explore the application of Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) to the analysis of mixtures and quantification of aggregates without the need for separation. TDA is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii and its coupling with microcapillaries reduces sample consumption to just tens of nanolitres per measurement. Using UV detection, small sample pulses are monitored as they transition across detection windows to produce temporally evolved concentration profiles, or Taylorgrams. The use of fitting models allows the Taylorgrams of mixtures to be deconvoluted; providing the hydrodynamic radii and relative proportions of the individual components.

Here, we present data on two types of mixtures that mimic samples typically encountered in Biopharmaceutical research and show how they can be characterized by TDA. The first example concerns the characterization of samples that have undergone low levels of self-association; whereas the second example considers mixtures containing higher order aggregates.
Summary: Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) is an absolute method for determining hydrodynamic size. TDA is performed on Malvern’s Viscosizer by observing the solute at two points along the capillary. These two points of observation are detected by UV absorbance and generate a Taylorgram.References: 1. Gill, W.N.; Sankarasubramanian, R. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 1970, 316, 341-350.Report abuse »
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