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The Effects of Stress and Shorter Sleep Duration on Concentrations of Proinflammatory Neuroinflammatory Molecules IL-6 and CRP in Circulation
EP39050
Poster Title: The Effects of Stress and Shorter Sleep Duration on Concentrations of Proinflammatory Neuroinflammatory Molecules IL-6 and CRP in Circulation
Submitted on 01 Jun 2022
Author(s): Farah Naser, Hamzah Algazali, Charlotte Bassett, Tori Cordero, Olivia Davis, Banban Tan
Affiliations: UNC Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Poster Views: 56
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Poster Information
Abstract: The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a peptide vasodilator known to be highly implicated in migraine pathogenesis, which is more prevalent in females than males (Kee et al., 2018). Recent studies have identified a genetically defined subpopulation expressing CGRP that plays a functional role in sex differentiation within the Locus Coeruleus (LC), a key nuclei of the norepinephrine system which regulates multiple diverse behaviors and psychological processes (Manger & Eschenko, 2021; Mulvey et al., 2018). Although there is evidence of CGRP’s sex-differential response in LC-NE neurons, there is limited research exploring CGRP’s interaction within other NE subpopulations. Additionally, due to the historic sex bias and sex omission present in neuroscience literature, research surrounding sex differences within the NE system is also lacking. In this study, we aim to quantify CGRP expression in the A1 and A2 noradrenergic nuclei using a dual IHC method on a transgenic strain of female and male mice. We hypothesize that expression of CGRP in the noradrenergic anatomical subpopulations of A1 and A2 will be higher in female mice as compared to male mice. The norepinephrine system is involved with many common neurological disorders that are mediated by molecular sex differences in distinct neuronal populations; therefore, this study could contribute to the possible mechanisms of treatment for these disorders and broaden our understanding of the relationship between CGRP and the norepinephrine system.Summary: his study aimed to investigate CGRP expression in the A1 and A2 regions to offer insight into CGRP’s role in migraine pathophysiology with an emphasis on sex differences. It is evident that there is a clear sex bias for males in the field of neuroscience and often times, analysis of females is not performed. As such, this study utilizes both males and females to aid in bridging a gap in neuroscience literature to allow for the development of proper treatments due to sex differences in CGRP.References: Aggarwal, M., Puri, V., & Puri, S. (2012). Effects of estrogen on the serotonergic system and calcitonin gene-related peptide in trigeminal ganglia of rats. Annals of Neurosciences, 19(4), 151–157. https://doi.org/10.5214/ans.0972.7531.190403
Deen, M., Correnti, E., Kamm, K., Kelderman, T., Papetti, L., Rubio-Beltrán, E., Vigneri, S., Edvinsson, L., & Maassen Van Den Brink, A. (2017). Blocking CGRP in migraine patients – a review of pros and cons. The Journal of Headache and Pain, 18(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s10194-017-0807-1
Durham, P. L. (2006). Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) and Migraine. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, 46(s1), S3–S8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2006.00483.x
Edvinsson, L. (2017). The Trigeminovascular Pathway: Role of CGRP and CGRP Receptors in Migraine. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, 57(S2), 47–55. https://doi.org/10.1111/head.13081
Eisenstein, M. (2020). Closing the gender gap in migraine research.
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