Posters
« Back
The Moderating Role of Social Support on Mental Health and Life Satisfaction After Adverse Childhood Experiences
EP38226
Poster Title: The Moderating Role of Social Support on Mental Health and Life Satisfaction After Adverse Childhood Experiences
Submitted on 21 Mar 2022
Author(s): Muath Alghamdi, MPH, DrPH (c) Jerry W. Lee, PhD, Anna Nelson, DrPH, Rhonda Spencer-Hwang, DrPH
Affiliations: School of Public Health, Loma Linda University
This poster was presented at Society for Public Health Education - SOPHE
Poster Views: 355
View poster »


Poster Information
Abstract: Title: The Moderating Role of Social Support on Mental Health and Life Satisfaction After Adverse Childhood Experiences
Background: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a tremendous burden for public health and have been linked with numerous chronic diseases and shortened lifespan. ACEs have been associated with increased risky behaviors, mental illness, and low life satisfaction. However, social support has been reported to reduce some of these outcomes. To date, little research has been conducted about the effect of negative and positive social support after ACEs.
Purpose: This study assesses the role of positive and Negative Social Support as a moderating factor in modifying the association of ACEs with mental health and life satisfaction.
Methods: Data was taken from the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Cohort Study which included participants residing in the U.S. and Canada (2006-2007) (N=10,193). The generalized linear model was utilized to assess the association of ACEs with mental health and life satisfaction; and the interaction of positive and negative social support in these associations.
Result: ACEs were negatively associated with mental health and life satisfaction. Additionally, Positive Social Support was associated with an increase in mental health and life satisfaction, while Negative Social Support showed a strong negative effect in both. As moderators, Positive Social Support showed a significant buffering effect on the association between ACEs and mental health and life satisfaction, while Negative Social Support had no deteriorating effect except for rejection, after adjusting for control variables.
Conclusion: Protective effects of Positive Social Support (primarily instrumental and informational support) and debilitating effects of Negative Social Support (rejection) were observed when predicting both mental health and life satisfaction among individuals with ACEs, as compared to none. This study presented one vital step in advancing our understanding of the possible protective role of social support along with providing several implications for clinical practice, community-based intervention. Health professionals should pay attention equally to the impact of both Positive Social Support and Negative Social Support when working with victims. Nonetheless, longitudinal research in a diverse population is required.
Summary: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been associated with numerous health issues as shortened lifespan, chronic diseases, mental illness, low life satisfaction. Yet to date, little research has assessed the effect social support on health after ACEs. This study assesses the role of positive and negative social support as a moderating factor in modifying the association of ACEs with mental health and life satisfaction. Report abuse »
Questions
Ask the author a question about this poster.
Ask a Question »

Creative Commons